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20121002
20121010
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CNN 3
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
code at the university of north carolina. >> all speech must be civil. and that feels right. why not have nice speech? but the civil rights movement and the protests sitting on a lunch hall and refusing to leave on a lunch counter because they're racist, it's important not to be civil all the time. >> bill: if i go down there and i call somebody a pinhead, am i arrested by the campus police? >> you, according to their code, would be kicked out of school. >> bill: is that right? wow! >> probably wouldn't do it for pinhead. >> bill: wow. i bet you they would if it were me. i bet you they would. >> you do much worse. >> bill: the guys in "animal house" they're not going to the university of north carolina. that's not happening. that movie could have never been made if all the colleges had these. >> these codes are since animal house. in response to "animal house." >> bill: tell them time coming down if they don't knock it off. when we come right back, strange twist to a strange case of welfare fraud. the woman who committed it was a big lottery winner and now she's done. legal is ne
brown, diana's co-director of the advancement project, a civil rights organization that filed the lawsuit. thank you for your time. we played that state lawmaker who said if that law was in effect in pennsylvania, he felt that governor romney would win that state, done. the polling shows opposite. nevertheless there was a concern. let's talk about the split decision. the judge is blocking it for now, but what happens next? >> well, you know, this is a big victory for democracy. it paves the way for free, fair, and accessible voting. we know that there were hundreds of thousands of people who would have been impacted by this and would not have had the i.d. we're very pleased that, in fact, in november people can vote without that i.d. we will continue to fight this law because we know that in the end that it impacts elderly voters, young voters and people of color and veterans in the state of pennsylvania. >> what's interesting and the irony we've been talking about is that there was always a great debate that there was no proof of significant voter fraud, not just in pennsylva
for anybody who studies his history and what he's done for this country, both as a veteran and as a civil rights leader but that's beside the point. the point is that this tape, for the most part, is much ado about nothing. but the republican sometimes can be pretty good at making something out of nothing. so it will be interesting to see how people react. >> gloria, what do you make of it? >> i just think that if you are disposed not to like president obama and you think that jeremiah wright ought to be relitigated, which i don't, that you are going to look at this and go oh, yeah, yeah, okay, yeah, jeremiah wright. that was something that was discussed in the last campaign and for better or worse, let me disagree with eric here. i believe that people, voters, believe they know what they need to know about president obama. they may think he's done a great job of handling the economy, getting us out of the ditch. they may think that he's done a terrible job, in which case they will vote against him. but i think what a tape like this does is just sends people back into their corners and ki
for looking at all these forces that were set in motion, women's rights, civil rights, all wedded to what i hope to be a very captivating yarn about a detective and his wife who come into possession of two diaries that offer secrets about the lincoln assassination. >> tim, lincoln is hot to death right now. there's your book about lincoln, steven carter wrote a book "the impeachment of abe lincoln." there was a movie "lincoln vampire hunter. qrequesting requesting of course, the daniel day-lewis movie which comes out next month. >> congress must never declare equal those who god created unequal. >> leave the constitution alone. >> stepped out on the world's stage with the fate of human dignity in our hands. blood has been spilled to afford us this moment, now, now, now. he really looks like lincoln, but the question is why is lincoln so hot right now? >> i think lincoln has always been hot. he's one of those mythical figures in american history, and i think we as a society revisit him from time to time because he's so compelling, and i think the lincoln conspiracy is an effort to recapture
. in the 20 years between 1940 and 1960 before any civil rights legislation than in the years following. most blacks lifted themselves out of policy but liberal politics and black leaders have claimed credit. what credit is there that affirmative action has worked? >> thomas is an impressive thinker and i have great respect for him. i'm not necessarily aattacking it. it's clear that the condition of black people nationally has improved greatly since the '60s, which is when affirmative action started. it's kind of an argument about whether it was because of anti-discrimination laws and just racial progress as opposed to affirmative action. we think that if you assume for the sake of argument that it was helping at first, helping to elevate people out of poverty, it has now become a machine spinning out of control. the preferences are very large, as rick said. we think it's leading people into -- it's really entrapping people to go to college that do not tell them you're not likely to do very well here. they just want to koubt their racial numbers and it's supposed to be temporary. it started i
is cnn's deborah feyerick. >> reporter: it is a scene that played out in states across the country. civil rights groups pushing back against voter i.d. laws enacted by republican controlled legislatures since 2010. >> the effort to change the rules of the game at the last minute is a really misguided effort. >> reporter: wendy wiser is with the brandon center for justice and warns hundreds of thousands of voters may not have necessary i.d. they include the elderly, college students, poor people, blacks and latinos, groups that traditionally vote democratic. >> we need to do everything we can to ensure that there is no fraud in our elections, but what we shouldn't be doing is passing unnecessary laws that needlessly exclude thousands or hundreds of thousands of eligible americans from participating equally in our democracy. >> reporter: the new voter i.d. laws protect only against voter impersonation. in pennsylvania, a traditional swing state, lawyers for both sides admit no known cases of in person fraud. still, it is a problem says conservative columnist john fund, an expert on the subj
in passing the great society legislation, civil rights, the big ticket items and a note earlier era. there is an argument about steady leadership that could pave the way. on the flip side, this is the most partisan, divided congress in 100 years, and that does not count for nothing. that plays a huge role. it also feeds into the frustration people have with congress -- why can they not get this deal done? we know it needs to happen. it is a growing problem. like so many things, policy- wise, it is difficult, if not impossible, and politically lawmakers tend to not want to do with it in until they're faced with all last possible moment to act because if they at earlier, they will certainly be criticized -- why did you make the deal this way or that way? both sides will be criticized. as we saw last summer during the standoff over raising the nation's debt ceiling, it went down to the last possible minute because neither side was willing to stick their necks out and say they would do something. that might not be the profile in courage that people expect from their lawmaker, but it is
of unique ways to get at the heart of what they care about. there is a whole history of whether it is civil rights or women's rights or workers' rights and people remember why it was needed to be created in the first place. they do not know they had to work 18 hours and overtime. you got paid a number and you cannot even live in the town where you worked. there is good have to be some kind of evolution and innovation in that movement. there are all kinds of interesting things in the corporate affairs works for the follow resources and create economic development. during the recession, banks were not lending. there were taking their own investment managers and seeking opportunities. that is smart. that is looking at, how can i get economic activity? how can i get a return? i think there is a lot of compelling union out there that are thinking differently about it. to underestimate the kind of political clout that unions have in america, it would not be smart. >> i would say one thing to watch as we go forward, politically, especially from new jersey and east, the unions have different powers
presidency. imagine what it would mean for civil rights and voting rights and so much more. >> reporter: but if the president is re-elected, what effect would it have on the court? >> well, president obama could have big impact on the court is if one of the more conservative justices, like swing vote anthony kennedy or justice antonin scalia who are both in their mid-70s, if they retired, then president obama could replace a conservative or a right leaning moderate. >> reporter: here's who could make the nominee list if president obama wins a second term. california attorney general harris is getting a lot of buzz. >> the california attorney general has political experience, which is really missing on the court right now. >> reporter: another name circulating is ja kwlen wen. if she's nominated, the california-based federal appeals judge would make history as the court's first asian-american justice. but that's no guarantee. and for example if ruth bader ginsburg is the only justice to retire, the liberal side of the court would not get any bigger. just a little younger. >> and as you k
to think about unique ways to get at the heart of what they care about. there is a history, whether civil or women's rights are workers' rights, were people remember why unions were created in the first place most of the world today has the recollection of what happened. you got paid in number that could not let you live in the town in which you lived. the walk to be an evolution in innovation. -- there will have to be an evolution in innovation. with a take their own money create economic development. -- where they take their own money and create economic development. their own investment managers and seeking out economic development opportunities. that is smart. that is looking at how to get folks work and do something to incentivize the economy to move again. there are a lot of intelligent unions thinking differently about it. there are a pretty powerful group. >> wanting to watch, especially in new jersey and the north east, we cut -- we come from more unionized states. one of the things that is important -- is a growing season between public sector and the trades and private sector.
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)